Germany 4 – Portugal 0

Thomas Müller (age 24) has entered the annals of football history with a hat-trick in the FIFA World Cup™, in the first match of the group stage against Portugal.

Müller, who plays for FC Bayern München scored three times, one of them from the penalty spot. It is the first time Müller pulls a hat-trick with the Nationalmannschaft. The last German player who scored three times in a World Cup match was Miroslav Klose in 2002, when Germany trashed Saudi Arabia 8 – 0.

According to FIFA, Müller’s hat-trick is the 49th in the history of the World Cup.

Some more interesting facts about hat-tricks in the World Cup:

  • Switzerland 1954 is the World Cup with more hat-tricks: 8. 2 of them took place during the quarter-final rounds.

 

  • Gonzalo Higuaín (Argentina) was the last footballer to score a hat-trick. He did so in the South Africa 2010 World Cup in the match against South Korea.

 

  • The quickest hat-trick to be completed is Erich Probst’s (Austria) during the 1954 World Cup.

 

  • Cristiano Ronaldo, Lionel Messi, Zinedine Zidane, Ronaldinho, Fernando Torres, David Villa, Ronaldo, Michael Ballack, what do they have in common? They have not scored a hat-trick during a World Cup, at least not yet.
Pepe of Portugal headbutts Thomas Mueller of Germany resulting in a red card during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group G match between Germany and Portugal at Arena Fonte Nova on June 16, 2014 in Salvador, Brazil.
Pepe of Portugal headbutts Thomas Mueller of Germany resulting in a red card during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group G match between Germany and Portugal at Arena Fonte Nova on June 16, 2014 in Salvador, Brazil.

Germany won the match 4 – 0 in Arena Fontenova (Salvador), Brazil. The other goal was scored by Mats Hummels. Chancellor Angela Merkel was among the VIP spectators of the match.

Salvador, Brazil. Angela Merkel comments on Thomas Müller's hat-trick.
Salvador, Brazil. Angela Merkel comments on Thomas Müller’s hat-trick.

 

June 16th, 2014.

 

TRC

 

Sources: FIFA and Wikipedia.

 

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